Joel's Highfive Blue HTPLA

HTPM1705-HFB

Regular price $29.99 USD

Fleck 'n fun with Joel Telling!

  • Our 1st metallic finish filament & 2nd sparkly release after Stardust
  • In collaboration with content creator 3D Printing Nerd, Joel Telling
  • Joel's favorite color, blue, with medium silver fleck in HTPLA
  • Medium fleck brings balance of layer-hiding texture & detail
  • Premium HTPLA for world-class quality, finish & performance
About Highfive Blue:
Fellow 3D Printing Nerds, we are fans of Joel Telling just like you! We'd all love to capture a bit of his energy, right? Rather than bottle it, seems more appropriate in filament form, don't you agree? We left out the caffeine for safety sake, but the metallic finish is indeed energetic, and it's Joel's favorite color, blue! Yes, this material is awesome. Is it really awesome?  It's awesome. Awesome.


Semi crystalline, heat treatable PLA for high temp use

Density: 1.24 g/cc
Length: 346 m/kg (1.75) 130 m/kg (2.85)
Typical Printing Temp: 205-225 C
Glass Transition (Tg)*: 60 C
Peak Crystallization (Tc)**: 95-115 C
Onset to Melt (Tm)***: 155 C
Typical change when heat treated: -2% x/y +1% z

Link to Safety Data Page

*max use with no heat treat & max platform temp
**heat treating @ temp 10+ min depending on size/mass
***max use when heat treated (annealed or crystallized)

HTPLA prints well at 205-225 C, however it's important to match temp to your hardware & volume flow rate. With a typical hotend, you should be able to print at 205 C without jamming at a low flow rate. In machines with hardware that tends towards jamming, consider this video with Joel Telling. Lower volume flows require lower temps, while higher volume flows require higher temps. In the previously-mentioned video, one way to overcome jamming is to set your temp to a higher-than-typical 240 C. This should then be matched with a high flow rate for a quality printing result. For direct drives with a short distance between drive gears & nozzle, volume flows can approach 7-8 cubic mm/s or more if printing hot to overcome jamming. For bowden tubes where the distance between drive gear & nozzle are great or less powerful hotends, as little as 2 and as much as 4 cubic mm/s may be the limit. Beware of unintended speed changes from faster infills & slowing down for outlines or short layers. Consider our Ultimaker-specific blog for more on this topic. A constant speed throughout the part is ideal from an extrusion perspective. Knowing your extrusion width, layer thickness & speed you can calculate your volume flow rate with the calculator like found in the previously-mentioned Ultimaker blog. Alternatively, if you know your volume flow rate limit, extrusion width & layer thickness, you can calculate your speed limit.
PLA & HTPLA are amorphous in structure as printed (no heat treating) & though both are adequate performers in an office environment, they have poor temperature stability, loosing significant stiffness at temps nearing 60 C. Different than standard PLA, HTPLA is designed to survive heat treating for higher temp stability in a no/minimal load condition to near onset of melting (155 C). That's an astonishing improvement in thermal stability compared to standard PLA after a quick bake in the oven after printing. In as little as 5-10 minutes for small, thin parts, HTPLA quickly crystallizes in an oven at 95-115 C (200-240 F) to become more stiff & hold form above glass transition (60 C). Depending on part geometry, setup & technique, parts can deform and shrink. Best results are with flat and/or supported parts with 100% infill. In this instance we experienced x/y shrinkage of about 2% & growth of about 1% in z. Be sure to avoid hot spots (non-radiating surfaces & no glowing coils) in the oven used for baking & experiment before baking a prized part. Un-printed filament works great for experimentation & translucent makes the transformation most visible! Heat treating is an art, but the resulting improved thermal performance, if needed, is well-worth exploring. You'll be shocked by the improved thermal stability of your HTPLA parts!!!

Material Safety Data Blog about heat treating Heat treating application blog Avoiding Jams on your Prusa blog Avoiding Jams on your Prusa video Tuning for your Prusa blog Tuning for your Ultimaker blog Tuning for your Lulzbot blog

 

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